Our PARTNERS

We've brought on some of the best and brightest minds in Detroit to serve as our trusted advisors.
We're honored by their belief in our mission and their support.

 
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Anna Clark

is a freelance journalist in Ann Arbor. Her writing has appeared in Elle Magazine, the New York Times, the Washington Post, Next City, the Columbia Journalism Review, and other publications. She was a U.S. Fulbright fellow in Nairobi, Kenya, and she is the founder of Literary Detroit. Anna edited A Detroit Anthology, a Michigan Notable Book, and she's the author of Michigan Literary Luminaries: From Elmore Leonard to Robert Hayden. She's a former writer-in-residence in Detroit public high schools through InsideOut Literary Arts, and, for many years, she's been co-leading an improv theater workshop at a men's prison in Macomb County, Michigan. Anna is currently at work on a book about the Flint water crisis for Metropolitan Books/Henry Holt. She is also a 2017 Knight-Wallace journalism fellow at the University of Michigan.

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Vince Datillo

became Vice President of Construction and Project Management for the Roxbury Group in 2008. He serves the firm and its clients as project manager, overseeing all aspects of project design, budgeting and construction. Prior to the Roxbury Group, Vince was the founding partner of a commercial construction and development firm. Vince has more than 20 years experience in urban redevelopment acting as lead construction manager on several multi-family residential and commercial projects in the City of Detroit and surrounding suburbs including Canfield Lofts, Art Center Town and Carriage Homes, Ferry Street Town Homes, and the Graybar Lofts at 55 West Canfield. Vince earned a Bachelor degree in Economics and Business Administration from Kalamazoo College.

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Kate Daughdrill

is an artist living and working in Detroit, Michigan. She received a Bachelor of Arts in Studio Art and Political & Social Thought from the University of Virginia and a Master of Fine Arts from Cranbrook Academy of Art. Recent projects include Detroit SOUP, a monthly dinner that funds micro-grants for creative projects in Detroit, and the Edible Hut, a community space with a living, edible roof in a public park in Detroit’s Osborn neighborhood. She was recently awarded a 2013 Kresge Artist Fellowship and the Robert C. Larson Venture Award and has received grants from Community + Public Art: Detroit and the Ford College Community Challenge. Daughdrill lives and works on Burnside Farm on Detroit’s east side. She is currently cultivating projects that explore the connections between plants, ceremony, and artistic energy.

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Rich Fahle

is an award winning filmmaker, writer, and organizer from Detroit her earned a 2014 Film/Theatre Kresge Fellow. In addition to film and media, hampton has written about music, culture and politics since 1990. She was a contributor to Vibe magazine for its first 15 years. Her articles have been published in The Village Voice, Spin, The Detroit News, Harper’s Bazaar, NPR, The Source, Essence, and Ebony. Hampton collaborated with Jay-Z on the New York Times bestselling book, “Decoded”. Hampton was the 2015 Visiting Artist at Stanford University's Institute for Diversity in the Arts where she taught "From Moments to Movements" a course on 21st century activism, new media and new narratives. She is a consultant at MomsRising, and a board member for the National Civil Rights Organization Color of Change. Hampton and Mike de la Rocha are partnered in a social impact agency, Revolve Impact, where they co-direct John Legend's #FREEAMERICA campaign to end mass incarceration.

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Kat Hartman

is an information designer who enjoys finding the intersections between design and research, her favorite being data visualization. She received her MFA from the University of Michigan Stamps School of Art + Design. She has worked as a data analyst at multiple non-profit organizations including Data Driven Detroit, a National Neighborhood Indicators Partner (NNIP) with the Urban Institute. She has also designed illustrated health materials for UNICEF in Botswana and German Agro Action in Ethiopia. She is currently an information design consultant with the data visualization firm, NiJeL and a fellow at the Civic Data Design Lab at the MIT School of Architecture & Planning as part of the City Digits project. 

Michael Stone Richards

participates in many aspects of Detroit's art + performance community including MOCAD, DIA, Write A House, and the journal Detroit Research of which he is editor and co-founder. He was also a founding member of Signal Return, a not-for-profit education-based community letterpress and print shop in Detroit. He has lectured nationally and internationally on contemporary art as well as on Social Practice in Detroit. Michael is Chair of the Committee on Critical Studies at the College for Creative Studies.

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Phil Cooley

opened Slows Bar B Q and Slows To Go with various partners and is a general contractor with O’Connor Development. Because of Slows' success, Cooley has been afforded the opportunity to help residents of Detroit in need. He works on projects ranging from helping others open small businesses, to designing and building public spaces like Ponyride. He is passionate about Detroit because he believes that it is a Democratic city where all are welcome to participate.

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Lynn Crawford

is the author of six books: Solow, Blow, Fortification Resort, Simply Separate People, Two and Shankus, and Kitto: A Saga. Her articles on art and literature have appeared in Art in America, Hyperallergic, Brooklyn Rail, Bookforum and Tema Celeste. She is a 2010 Kresge Literary Arts Fellow and a 2016 Rauschenberg Writing Fellow.

Jelani Cobb

has been contributing to The New Yorker and newyorker.com since 2013, and became a staff writer in 2015. He writes frequently about race, politics, history, and culture. His most recent book is “The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of Progress.” He’s an associate professor of history, and the director of the Africana Studies Institute, at the University of Connecticut. He won the 2015 Sidney Hillman Prize for Opinion and Analysis Journalism, for his columns on race, the police, and injustice.

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Jason Friedman

practices in many different legal areas including commercial litigation, business transactions, social media, partnership disputes, entertainment and family law. A native Texan, Friedman was born and raised in Dallas. He graduated from J.J. Pearce High School and obtained a B.S.B.A. from the University of Denver in Real Estate and International Business. In 2007, he graduated from Thomas M. Cooley School of Law. Friedman is also extremely active in the community being a founding member of the Alzheimer’s Foundation’s Blondes vs. Brunettes, a finalist for OneMan Dallas and board member and past chairman of LakeFest.

Airea D. Matthews

is an American poet. She won the 2016 Yale Younger Poet award. She is Assistant Director of The Helen Zell Writers’ Program. She graduated from University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, with an M.F.A. Her work has appeared in Best American Poetry 2015, American Poet, Four Way Review, The Missouri Review, Muzzle, The Baffler, Callaloo, Indiana Review, WSQ, SLAB, Michigan Quarterly Review, and Vida: Her Kind.

 

Mallory McMorrow

is a designer and creative director. She launched her career as the winner of the Mazda Design Challenge, after which she saw her concept car featured in publications such as Popular Mechanics, ESPN, and Glamour. She’s since worked as a designer for Hot Wheels, creative director for Gawker Media, and helped launch HeLo, an experiential production company. Her writing has appeared on Road & Track, Jalopnik, and Jezebel, and in 2013 she was featured as one of five “Ceiling-Shattering Women” on Refinery29. McMorrow lives with her fiancé and dog, Detroit, who, ironically, is from Los Angeles.